Assistive Listening Devices

Types of Assistive Listening Devices

Infrared Systems

A microphone is placed near the sound source. Using a special converter, sound from the microphone is converted into an invisible infrared signal that is delivered to a headset or earphones worn by the listener.

 

Best for:

Television viewing

Large room settings such as auditoriums, cinemas, theatres and churches

Hearing impaired individuals who are not wearing hearing aids

 

For more specific information on infrared listening device products, feel free to visit the Sennheiser Canada website.

 

FM Systems

The talker speaks into a microphone, often clipped into his/her collar, and the sound is delivered wirelessly to either (a) loudspeakers within the room, or (b) the listeners’ hearing aids.

 

Best for:

Educational/classroom settings

Large rooms such as conference rooms and theatres

Noisy listening situations

 

Telephone Amplifiers

For more specific information on amplified telephone products, feel free to visit the Clarity® website

 

a) In-line Amplifiers

In-line amplifiers are small, portable amplifying devices that are connected between the base of the telephone and the cord of the handset. They have adjustable volume controls, and tone controls to enhance the bass or treble pitches of the sound.

 

Best for:

Hearing impaired individuals with or without hearing aids Individuals who need a compact and portable phone amplifier Corded (modular) telephones b)

 

b) Volume Controlled Phones

Volume controlled phones have amplification systems built in. They have adjustable volume controls, and tone controls to enhance the bass or treble pitches of the sound. Some phones may also have high volume ringers. They are available in corded (modular) or cordless models.

 

Best for:

Hearing impaired individuals with or without hearing aids

 

Alerting Devices

Alerting devices use a visual (light) or tactile (vibration) signal to alert hearing impaired people to certain sounds. Examples include alarm clocks, doorbells, telephone ringers and smoke alarms that use vibration or strobe lights.

 

Best for:

Hearing impaired or deaf individuals who have trouble hearing traditional bells or buzzers, regardless of whether or not they wear hearing aids.